A Conversation With Chloe Violette

“This last year has been about celebrating women in the creative arts. Hence the film clip I’ve just released- it was done by an all-female team from the producer to the cinematographer, the camera assistants and the editor. It was a really liberating experience. We’re slowly smashing the patriarchy!”

RSOM recently spoke to the amazing Chloe Violette about her new music video, and her hopes for equality in the music industry.

I’m so amazed that everyone working on the ‘Hurricane’ film clip was female, it’s just so unheard of. How do you feel that completing a project in such a way will assist women in the industry going forward?

“Well it’s still very much a male-dominated industry, and it’s still very much a man’s world. We’re slowly, with the help of social media and other platforms that promote ‘girls to the front’ and everything, getting there. It’s a necessity that we need to have these things and have these conversations, even though it’s a bit unfortunate and honestly a bit sad. I looked over at one point and was like ‘Oh, we’re all chicks!’ which is amazing, but it is about exposing the fact that this isn’t considered normal, when it should be. The equality is still definitely not there. It’s one step at a time, I guess. It’s cool to work with like-minded people and if they happen to identify as female, then that’s really cool.”

Do you think that you’ll use the team that you used for the film clip in the future?

“Oh definitely, 100%. I’ve actually joined the collaborative of the filmmakers involved. I rounded up these girls and this was the first collaboration that they had done. And now they’ve gone on to do other work together. They’re currently doing a film clip for CHMBRS and other female artists in the industry. I feel really privileged to be a part of that connection. I’m working as a production assistant on their next project which is really cool.”

Hurricane Video Clip – an original by Chloe Violette

You talk about how hard it is in the music industry as a female, and it is. However on top of that you’re also in Melbourne, which is one of the most difficult music scenes to break out into in the world. Do you find yourself wanting to empower other women in the industry rather than compete with them?

“It’s such a competitive industry. There’s so many incredible musicians out there and it’s so daunting just to think about how many people are out there that want what you want. So there is that natural tendency to compare yourself to other women and think ‘oh wow they’re doing so much and they’re achieving this or that’ and that can sort of get you down quite a lot. I’ve learnt in the past year or so to just remember why I’m doing and why I’m pursuing music; why I’m playing it and making it. It’s a part of me. If you can join forces with other people just to remember why you’re making the art you’re making, it’s so much more thrilling. Collaborating and sharing that experience is so much more rewarding.”

 And so do you believe social media enhances or hinders this empowerment?

“It’s so easy to get caught up in that superficial love of the ‘double-tap love hearts,’ and the likes and followers, so it’s really easy to compare yourself to others. It’s just the reality of 2017 I guess, when we’re living in the digital world. It’s so important though to just go back to that authenticity and that organic nature of the fact that we’re musicians and we make music because it helps us make sense of the world. I think that’s the important bit- to bring back the perspective every now and again. It’s so easy to get lost in the idea of success on social media, but it goes so far beyond that.”

 Social media can be an entirely tricky thing regardless too!

“Exactly. At the end of the day when you’re promoting your music or art on social media, it’s your own business and your own branding. It can be really difficult to promote yourself, especially when you’re not used to it and have a tendency to have a lot of emotions, as many of us in the creative arts do. I have this saying on my bedroom wall ‘it’s both a blessing and a curse to feel everything so deeply,’ which really resonates with me because when you are an emotional person you can put those thoughts and ideas onto paper or onto canvas, but it also comes with the downfall of experiencing negative emotions and the thoughts that follow. But you do have to have an online business presence because you’re essentially selling yourself and your music.”

Going forward into the future, do you think even more must change for women to further progress in the music industry? What do you think should be done?

“I think it’s a matter of education and it’s a matter of conversation. It’s easy to be ‘pigeonholed’ as a ‘raging feminist.’ But every intelligent person should understand the word ‘equality,’ and therefore needs to be a feminist. There’s still a lot of stigma behind the word ‘feminism’ and for us to move forward and promote that equality, so that in however many years’ time this conversation is no longer necessary. I don’t know how long that’s going to take and I don’t know if it’s going to happen. I do know that for it to happen; however, we need to have conversations and we need to stick together and we need to educate. We’re doing it already though, the way we’re going is the right way and I don’t know how else we’re going to get the word across. But everyone who understand equality needs to understand feminism and promote it.”

 Who are your favourite female musicians in the industry at the moment?

“ I cannot get enough of Julia Jacklin, and I’m also totally blown away by Gretta Ray. She’s so young and her sound and song writing ability is so mind blowing. They’re doing an amazing job at representing women in the Australian music industry and encouraging other female artists to get themselves out there.

 The film clip was launched at the Malthouse Theatre back in May and was a successful night.

CHLOE 2

Check out Chloë Violette on:
Website | Facebook | Instagram

Written by Jordyn Hoesktra

 

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