JOIN THE #RSOMCOMMUNITY

Take a look at the following video from Jena as she pledges for everyone to join the #RSOMCOMMUNITY in order to support all Melbourne musicians during this tough time.

Be sure to make sure you tune in this Sunday for our first Real Songwriters Live on Instagram!

RSOM ANNOUNCES THE RETURN OF RSOM LIVE!

The Real Songwriters of Melbourne is so excited to announce the return of their RSOM Live series – this time with a twist. What was the most loved event on the RSOM calendar, the weekly live event will now take place on Instagram starting from Sunday 19 April.

“Everyone’s much loved event is coming live to your screens as next Sunday premieres the first RSOM IG LIVE! We are so excited to return back to the digital world and we cannot wait to bring you fresh music from our amazing Melbourne artists to the #RSOMCOMMUNITY.”

The post was announced on RSOM’s Instagram today due to popular demand and we cannot wait to reveal the Artists who will be taking part.

Please make sure you are following us on Instagram to keep in the loop for further updates!

ABBEY STONE RELEASES THIRD SINGLE ‘FLOWERS’ AND ANNOUNCES BADLADY EP LAUNCH

Nothing is stopping Abbey Stone this year as she once again releases another powerful hit titled ‘Flowers.’

Flowers continues on from the stem of her previous single, Say Anything as she explores frustration, grief and sadness.

“I wrote Flowers as a form of therapy when I felt neglected. I was word vomiting through tears and trying to make sense of a feeling I’d never experienced. I really noticed a shift in my own reactions after I wrote it. As lame as it may be, it was really healing.”

Not only is this sassy gal releasing her next single, but she is putting on a show to celebrate her forthcoming EP, BADLADY which will be on Friday March 27.

Joined by up and coming Melbourne singer/songwriter Maya Rose as well as band members Sean Hutton and Claude Carranza, Abbey Stone will be gracing the Birds Basement stage to celebrate the release.

The three singles BADLADY, Say Anything and now Flowers already prove that this EP will definitely be one not to miss. The EP resonates strength, self-importance and self-love from the title sassy track BADLADY to Abbey’s strength in Flowers.

The third single ‘Flowers’ to Abbey’s new EP ‘BADLADY’ is out now on all major streaming services. Click the link below to hear it first! Also, tickets are now available to purchase for the BADLADY EP Launch via link below.

Listen to Abbey Stone’s new single, ‘Flowers’ here

BADLADY EP LAUNCH ft Maya Rose
Friday March 27
Birds Basement, Singers Lane, CBD
Tix: $24 + BF
Click here to buy tickets

 

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ABBEY STONE DROPS SECOND SINGLE OF BADLADY EP

Following the success of single, #BADLADY, Abbey Stone is ready to
drop her next track titled SAY ANYTHING.

Featuring Claude Carranza (Black Sorrows, Kids in the Kitchen) on guitars, the song shows another side to Stone – one that we haven’t seen before.

In contrast to her previous single, #BADLADY released in Dec, this next release shows a different side to Stone as she talks about being caught up in your emotions and letting them take over.

“The song is very much about letting your anxiety fight for you; taking a back seat and knowing you’re about to blurt things out that you don’t mean. Whether it be, “I hate you,” or, “I love you,” I’ve definitely been guilty of speaking purely from emotion and then feeling different soon after.”

Say Anything will be the second single to be featured on her forthcoming EP, BADLADY, set for release next month.

Listen to Abbey Stone’s new single now by clicking this link.

CATCH ABBEY STONE WITH UPCOMING SHOWS

SAT 8 FEB: Renee Geyer with Abbey Stone @ Birds Basement
SAT 22 FEB: Russell Morris with Abbey Stone @ Birds Basement 

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ABBEY STONE RELEASES NEW SINGLE – BADLADY

BADLADY, the female anthem of 2019 is the long awaited new release from the fearless Abbey Stone.

Out now, the track relates to the everyday working woman and sings the message of empowerment and strength. It recognises the importance of self worth and self love in a world that can put you down.

“It’s deciding to roll with the punches but making your confidence, peace and happiness a priority,” says Stone.

“BADLADY is a song that I wrote at the end of an awful day.  It sparked the idea that I couldn’t give from an empty cup. I had to reset and find a way to go about my daily life in the most empowered way possible; first and foremost for myself, and in turn, for those around me.”

The release is also a credit to Abbey’s growth and dedication as an independent Artist in the Melbourne music scene. Upon releasing her last EP, Complete, in 2017, in which she earned her first production credit, BADLADY steps up to the next level as the production has resulted in a sexy and sassy track.

Following the release of her last EP, Complete, Stone has been head deep in writing and performing with notable key performances including singing alongside Brian Cadd and Russell Morris at Crown Casino. Another big highlight for the 24 year old was performing at the Palais Theatre in November 2018 supporting Richard Marx.

BADLADY will become a part of an exciting new EP set to be released in summer 2020.

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LISTEN TO THE LATEST SINGLE FROM ABBEY STONE HERE

Check out Abbey Stone on:
Website| Facebook| Spotify| Instagram| YouTube|

A Conversation With LACUNA

Tamara Violet Partridge may only be 22 years of age, but she’s already making her stance in Melbourne’s electronic music scene. Apart from working on her debut album, she’s currently focusing on her headlining show ‘Ladies to the Front,’ a showcase of women in electronic music. RSOM sat down and spoke to Tamara about all things feminism and all things music. 

Welcome back to RSOM, do you just want to start by giving us a rundown of what you’ve been up to since we spoke to you last October?

“I’ve been teaching for the last year or so, and I’ve helped written the curriculum for the course I teach. Other than that, I’ve been working on the album which is set to release later this year or early next year. I’ve got a single with my first professional music video accompanying it in the next few months as well coming out, which has been fun to make and collaborate with people on. I’ve basically just been writing a heap of songs and working out which ones to pick and choose from, because I’d rather write 20 tracks and pick the 10 best ones, the great ones. Just a lot of writing at this stage is where I’m at.”

You’ve got an amazing project coming up called ‘Ladies to the Front,’ where you’re headlining. Are you able to tell us what that’s about?

“The whole process of it really was that I wanted to put on a show that showcased women in the electronic music scene in Melbourne, because there are a lot of really prevalent artists that just aren’t making it to radio play or are getting the recognition they deserve when they get to that touring or even international level that male artists are getting. I just think to myself ‘well why is that?’. It’s not in a negative way or to put down any male artists at all, we’re just trying to create equality in a safe space for female artists because it can be very confronting. Especially in electronic music where there’s still that association with technology being a ‘masculine’ thing. It’s a very boys club kind of thing, which is totally fine, but it’s making sure that everyone feels equal regardless of what industry they’re in. It’s the same thing with DJ’ing, it’s not something that should be surprising or more engaging, I want you to come see me because I’m a good DJ, not because I’m a woman. The more shows we put on with women involved, where women are in the front, the better. It’s just one evening where we’re saying, ‘these chicks have worked really hard, let’s celebrate that.’

What are you looking forward to most about it?

“People have said that it’s becoming a theme in society, which is actually kind of offensive in its own right. I feel like it’s been a major theme in society since the suffragettes, but now we have the technology, the statistics and the power to talk about it. It’s like when people say, ‘feminism doesn’t have a place in modern society’ and I’m like ‘well let me tell you why it does and I know you’re allowed to have your opinion but here’s why your opinion is wrong’- statistically speaking. It’s just about that education, because sometimes people just don’t know and that’s fine too. But you need to be open minded and be willing to learn new things that you didn’t learn whilst growing up. I’m looking forward to people seeing a great show and not single out the fact that it is women performing.”

It seems like a lot of female electronic artists adopt these badass stage names. Do you feel as if ‘Lacuna’ gives you a sense of identity and confidence when out in the industry?

“It does, because I feel like as a composer when I perform it’s a totally different approach to music and a totally different industry. Being able to put a ‘Lacuna’ hat on, I talk about feminine power and feminine sexuality and mental health and sexual harassment. These are all themes throughout my album and themes throughout my music, because I like to sing about taboos. So that they’re not taboos anymore and people don’t feel isolated in these situations. I don’t get the chance to do that in composition because I’m working with someone else’s story and I’ve worked so hard to control my attitude, like I never can really express how I feel. When I’m singing; however, I can just belt out or even scream how I feel and I can swear and it’s not to my name, it’s to the name of something inside of me. I feel like Lacuna is the part of me that just wants to aggressively yell about it.”

You’re obviously a deep songwriter, but you play electronic music. Do you find it difficult to reflect the lyrics you’ve written into the electronic sounds and songs you create?

“See, that’s the easy part, which is actually really weird. I find that the hardest part is finding the flow of the story, and bringing it back into a mainstream, popular approach. It comes down to personality which is the beautiful thing about music- every artist will have a different challenge. The lyrics have always been the easy part for me and it’s something that in the Lacuna project I start with and make the beat around it. The darker or the more societally unacceptable a topic is, the more upbeat and happier key I’ll put it in to mask that. So, when people listen to it, they’re like ‘oh it’s a really good song,’ but then they find out what it’s really about and they’re shocked but realise that the song actually has a really great message.”

What’s the electronic scene like in Melbourne and do you feel like you’re empowered by the other women around you?

“Yes! And that’s exactly why I’m doing this gig. There are so many people that were on the list that couldn’t make it for various reasons and it’s like ‘why aren’t as famous as Banks’ or even male artists, it’s just like why not!? I think there’s still that unconscious bias, even though it’s getting better. You look at some of the artists and you’re like ‘you have everything perfected and there’s nothing else you need to do with your music so why is it different?’ Even the bands we play with are amazing and have done heaps of things already but people are still unaware of who they are. There are so many B-grade male DJs that people know about, yet the A-grade female DJs are almost unheard of. I don’t understand why it’s still like ‘oh so you’re a female DJ.’ Like no, I’m just a DJ, I wouldn’t call you a “male DJ.” There are so many female electronic artists and mixed bands that have trouble over male acts. There’s a big support system though. I’d love to turn it into an ongoing series too, and I might not even need to play at the next one because there’s so many female electronic artists out there. Electronic music is popping up everywhere, especially female musicians and it’s just great.”

Who are your favourite women in music and in electronic music currently?

“I think the biggest person is Bjork, like from when I was a kid. There are a lot of European artists, as well as Banks, FKA Twigs. I also love the RnB side, the girls I grew up with like TLC, Destiny’s Child, Missy Elliot, those who are big in the electronic/RnB scene. They changed the world. It’s really great when artists are the turning point for you, like FKA Twigs inspired me to want to perform again because what she’s doing is so amazing.”

Check out LACUNA on:

Facebook | InstagramSpotify

 

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Written by Jordyn Hoekstra
Photos courtesy of Vinyl Planet 
Productions live at Ladies To The Front at
Gasometer Hotel, Collingwood June 1 2017

GRETTA RAY

“I think part of me always knew that I was going to be a performer – I was lucky enough to begin performing at a very young age, and became addicted to it pretty much instantly!”

At just 19 years of age, Gretta Ray has had a big couple of years. Having been announced 2016’s Triple J Unearthed High winner, Gretta has since gone on to play sets at Falls Festival and Splendour in the Grass. 2017 has seen her return from a stint in the United States.

2016 was also the year Gretta won the Vanda & Young Songwriting Competition, on the day of her Year 12 English exam, no less. It was an accomplishment, she says, she still can’t believe happened.

“It was amazing to be recognised and credited for my songwriting, because it is something that I have been working at for years. At that point in time, Drive was the song that I was most proud of. I am so grateful to have had the support from APRA that I have,” Gretta tells RSOM.

What was an eventful day for Gretta was also a reflection on her ability to balance her studies and her role in the music industry.

“I do recall feeling a sense of pride that I was able to maintain a balance (between school and music). I intended to give both areas of my life the same amount of energy, and that night I felt like that was something that I was achieving.” 

So surely such a stellar start to a career would require a kickstart from an early age? That certainly was the case for Gretta, with many of her family also being musicians. She says music was an underlying theme of her childhood.

“I grew up playing instruments and singing in choirs, as well as going to see a lot of shows with my mum, who made sure I was immersed in music from a young age.”

At the age of seven, songwriting had become a hobby, writing what she could on her keyboard, and she admits it was a hobby she quickly became passionate about.

“I didn’t write another song until about two years later, but from that point forward I really kicked into gear and was writing little ditties whenever I got the chance to.

“I perceived songwriting as a hobby that made me fantasise about being a performer. I think the moment that I knew that I wanted that fantasy to become a reality. I think the moment that I knew that I wanted that fantasy to become a reality was during the process of recording my debut EP ‘Elsewhere’. I was in my element in the space of a studio.”

Along with songwriting, Gretta began performing at a young age and as a result has years of experience performing music in Melbourne. Having performed with groups such as Young Voices of Melbourne and If You See Her, Say Hello, Gretta believes that her experience with these groups, particularly in Melbourne, have shaped her into the artist she is today.


“Within the choirs that I have been a part of in the past, I have learnt much about myself as a musician, and also made some beautiful, talented, life long friends.

The Melbourne music scene is an incredible community, too. I’m very proud to be a part of it.”

Some years later, Gretta is known in the Australian music scene for her perfect rhyming, and use of alliteration, when writing. Despite her love of the English language; however, she admits that she doesn’t have a particular song writing process, and says this is what makes song writing worthwhile.

“A song often starts with a seed of inspiration, a concept, that I have been pondering on for a while. I will accumulate a bunch of ideas in relation to the initial idea, and then set side time to sit down with my work and construct the song.” 

And as for what she finds herself writing about, Gretta is particularly interested writing autobiographically, reflecting, rather than focusing on a narrative.

“I have predominantly written about relationships and the notion of observing the human condition. I want to write about a range of things over the duration of my career. 

[With Drive] I wanted to write a song that explored that concept of the intimate, magical atmosphere that is created in the space of a car when one is driving around with someone they love. In this song, the idea is portrayed as more of a fantasy than a reality.” 

With an abundance of songs up her sleeve, an EP and plenty more music to follow, Gretta is aiming to perfect her new music. Knowing the ins-and-outs of the Melbourne music scene, it will definitely be easier this time around, and slowly becoming a household name, she has plenty advice to pass on to up-and-coming songwriters.

Work really hard, make your own decisions about the direction of your career, seek inspiration, listen to those whom are more experienced in the industry and take their advice on board, continue to grow as a writer and person, challenge yourself but don’t become overly obsessive about your writing. Let your emotions and creativity drive your project.” 

There is no doubt that Gretta has had a massive couple of years, and that 2018 will be even bigger. Having finished off 2017 touring the country with fellow Melburnian Vance Joy, Gretta is back in the studio and is hoping to release more music in the near future.

You can check out Gretta on:

Facebook | Twitter YouTube | Website

Written by Jordyn Hoekstra